Angela’s ABCs: words sometimes confused – all together and altogether

All together and altogether are homophones, which means they sound alike, but they have different meanings. I, for one, find it easy to confuse them, so the explanation below is for my benefit as well as anyone else who might be interested. All together, a two-word phrase, means collectively, with each other, everyone doing something all at once or all in one place: We gathered round the piano and sang the folk song all together.       (It’s possible to break up this two-word saying as in “We all gathered round… Read More

Angela’s ABCs – words sometimes confused: flout and flaunt

Flaunt and flout are both verbs which sound sort of similar, but they don’t mean the same thing. When you flaunt yourself, your wealth, or your accomplishments, you’re parading them in front of people, displaying them ostentatiously and showing off. It sometimes seems that Facebook is just a vehicle for people to flaunt their fabulous holidays, their amazingly successful children and their sporting achievements. The male peacock flaunts his fabulous plumage in the hope of attracting the female.   When you flout something, you openly disregard it, scoff at it, mock it, or show scorn… Read More

Angela’s ABCs words sometimes confused: loathe and loath

One letter makes all the difference Loathe (rhymes with clothe) is a verb meaning to dislike intensely, to detest or to hate She enjoyed eating most fruits, but she loathed pineapple; even the smell made her feel sick. His strictly austere Presbyterian family brought him up to loathe Catholics because of their ritual and finery. Loath (rhymes with both) is an adjective meaning unwilling or reluctant The water was calm, but so bitterly cold that he was loath to jump in. Her boss’s reputation for sexual harassment was so well known that… Read More

Words Easily Confused – Dual and Duel by Angela Caldin

Dual is an adjective meaning double, twofold, composed of two parts or having a double character or purpose: They decided that their children should have dual nationality so that they could live in either country later on. He could only conclude that she had a dual personality – at times kind and charming, at others cruel and malicious. Duel is a noun or verb referring to a fight or struggle. It can refer to a prearranged combat between two people often using pistols or swords or to a struggle for domination or… Read More

Angela’s ABCs: Words Sometimes Confused – Purposely and Purposefully

I’ve heard these two adverbs confused twice this week, so I decided it would be worth looking closely at their definitions:   Purposely means intentionally, deliberately, on purpose.  When you mean to do something, you do it purposely: She crossed the road purposely because she didn’t want to have to speak to her ex-boyfriend. The footballer purposely tripped up the goalkeeper so that the ball would go into the net.     Purposefully means with a strong sense of purpose, or with determination and intent.  When you are determined to do something, you… Read More