Angela’s ABCs words sometimes confused: loathe and loath

One letter makes all the difference Loathe (rhymes with clothe) is a verb meaning to dislike intensely, to detest or to hate She enjoyed eating most fruits, but she loathed pineapple; even the smell made her feel sick. His strictly austere Presbyterian family brought him up to loathe Catholics because of their ritual and finery. Loath (rhymes with both) is an adjective meaning unwilling or reluctant The water was calm, but so bitterly cold that he was loath to jump in. Her boss’s reputation for sexual harassment was so well known that… Read More

Words Easily Confused – Dual and Duel by Angela Caldin

Dual is an adjective meaning double, twofold, composed of two parts or having a double character or purpose: They decided that their children should have dual nationality so that they could live in either country later on. He could only conclude that she had a dual personality – at times kind and charming, at others cruel and malicious. Duel is a noun or verb referring to a fight or struggle. It can refer to a prearranged combat between two people often using pistols or swords or to a struggle for domination or… Read More

Angela’s ABCs: Words Sometimes Confused – Purposely and Purposefully

I’ve heard these two adverbs confused twice this week, so I decided it would be worth looking closely at their definitions:   Purposely means intentionally, deliberately, on purpose.  When you mean to do something, you do it purposely: She crossed the road purposely because she didn’t want to have to speak to her ex-boyfriend. The footballer purposely tripped up the goalkeeper so that the ball would go into the net.     Purposefully means with a strong sense of purpose, or with determination and intent.  When you are determined to do something, you… Read More

Angela’s ABCs – Words Sometimes Confused: Titillate and Titivate

These two verbs are both rather fun, but have different meanings: to titillate means to excite, arouse or stimulate agreeably, sometimes in a sexually suggestive way; literally, it means to tickle or to excite a tingling sensation by stroking lightly: Tell me, what would titillate your taste buds, a custard tart or a cream cake? The story in the newspaper was designed to titillate rather than to report the facts of the matter. She decided to titillate his senses by gently allowing her arm to brush against his.   to titivate means… Read More

Angela’s ABCs: Noisome and Noisy

Everyone probably knows what noisy means,             but what about noisome? I realised today that I didn’t really know what noisome means. So I looked it up and now I know that it means: Offensive, disgusting harmful, injurious to health, noxious very disagreeable or unpleasant sickening, nauseating morally offensive Examples: They lived next door to a huge rubbish tip and were badly affected by the noisome vapours coming from the smouldering waste. A noisome stench emanated from the pile of decaying food.          … Read More