Angela’s ABCs I, me and myself

I, me and myself People often get confused between these three pronouns and I hope to give you a foolproof method of knowing which is right. It helps to know that a noun is the part of speech that is used to name a person, place, thing, quality, feeling or action, and that a pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun. The pronoun ‘I’ ‘I’ is only used when you are referring to yourself in the subject of the sentence. In other words, you are the one taking… Read More

Angela’s ABCs Hyphens and Dashes

Hyphens and Dashes A hyphen joins two or more words together (mother-in-law, able-bodied) while a dash is used for parenthetical statements (He was – as far as I could see – completely drunk). On a modern keyboard, the hyphen key is at the top between 0 and = In Microsoft Word, a dash is formed in your text by keying a space, then a hyphen, then another space. When you finish the next word, the hyphen will convert into a dash. If you want a dash without spaces, you can find it… Read More

Inheritance versus Election by Angela Caldin

I’ve been watching the celebrations for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee with enormous interest these last days and trying to decide whether I’m a monarchist or not. It’s beyond a doubt that our stalwart Queen has worked extremely hard for 60 years and been utterly committed to her duty. It’s also beyond question that, here in the UK, we know how to celebrate a royal occasion with a majestic flourish and how to put on a spectacular regal show, whatever the weather. Those 60 years embody a powerful argument for the monarchy, an… Read More

Angela’s ‘special’ ABCs

This is a special post for my friend and neighbour, Paul-Enguerrand Fady (aged 15). He asks, following the posts on advice and advise, practice and practise, licence and license: ‘What is the difference between defence and defense?’ The answer is very simple: defence is the UK spelling while defense is the US spelling. The same goes for offence (UK spelling) and offense (US spelling).

Tired of London, Enamoured of Life. By Angela Caldin

“Why, Sir, you find no man, at all intellectual, who is willing to leave London. No, Sir, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford.”  Samuel Johnson Dr Johnson’s words, so often quoted, darted into my mind when I had my recent Damascene moment. This came as I turned down a road high above the city of Auckland where a splendid view unfurled before me in the sunshine, sweeping down to the Skytower and the sparkling waters of… Read More