No News Is…News? By Trevor Plumbly

Stirred by the lead news stories in my country recently, I decided to risk belabouring the issues I raised in an earlier article. The media, it seems, feels that my font of knowledge would be tainted by hard news, and that the daily doings of the rich, famous and infamous are more suited to my intellect. Just for fun, I’ll run a few of these journalistic bombshells past you and trust that your pulse rate remains stable. ‘John Travolta accused of making sexual advances to a male masseur.’ Now apart from Mr… Read More

Games of the XXX Olympiad by Angela Caldin

The Olympics are imminent and those of us in London for the duration are wondering how it will all turn out. We’ve had the embarrassment of the graffiti-style logo and the mascots, Mandeville and Wenlock. We’ve had the failure to recruit enough security people and the decision to bring in the army. We’ve had the controversy over rooftop missile defence systems, which have been installed in spite of residents’ objections. We’ve had the confusion over the Olympic road lanes and who can use them when, closely followed by the rephasing of traffic… Read More

The Older, the Better by Angela Caldin

A while ago I wrote about Frankie Valli, Englebert Humperdinck and Diana Gould, older people who are playing a joyously active role in the world. Now, I’d like you to meet Beryl Renwick, 86 and Betty Smith, 90 who have recently won the award for best entertainment programme at the Sony Radio Academy Awards, beating off the competition from the likes of Frank Skinner and the BBC’s Adam & Joe.

Think On by Angela Caldin

A reporter, talking on the radio today about the bankers who have been found to have falsified interest rates in order to make even more money, said: ‘These bankers will very probably know the price of a bottle of Bollinger, but they will have no idea of the price of a bottle of milk.’

It Was A Pleasure To…By Trevor Plumbly

After hearing an old friend’s comments on his final regular broadcast, I couldn’t help feeling short-changed by the folks that run national radio here in New Zealand. Dougal Stevenson’s final remarks were delivered with the same calm dignity with which he had presented TVNZ national news for so many years. There’s far more to Dougal than a BBC accent, there’s a genuine love of the English language, a deceptively dry wit and, as I discovered, a willingness to encourage those new to public performances. My first encounter with him was for the… Read More