They shall inherit by Trevor Plumbly

The silly season The English get into trouble when they take things seriously, but happily, a sense of the ridiculous helps them cope. Elections are a serious business to the Brits so they lighten things up with odd characters like Lord Buckethead who received 239 votes at the last election when he stood against Theresa May in Maidenhead; he hailed that as a triumph, so like they say, ‘it’s not the winning……’ God only knows what motivates the man; maybe he just wants to illustrate what a pantomime the whole system has… Read More

Fairness by Susan Grimsdell

Dear Readers This week it’s our pleasure to introduce a new blogger to our team who has submitted her debut piece on the fascinating subject of fairness. Here are her thoughts and we hope you enjoy reading them: “It’s not fair” – the clarion call of childhood. From a very early age, humans of all cultures seem to have an inbuilt sense of what’s fair and what’s not. This might seem puzzling from an evolutionary point of view, which you’d assume would lead us to act in our own self-interest, but in most… Read More

Divided we fall by Trevor Plumbly

He ain’t heavy Outside of terrorism, race is about the scariest topic down here. Everybody, it seems, has an axe to grind from the disgruntled to the fearful; few of whom add much to national unity. Colonialism has got a lot to answer for: South Africa, Canada, Australia and New Zealand carry a huge burden of guilt when it comes to native rights, as they should, but surely today’s children are entitled to question why they should be saddled with paying the cost of ancient wrongdoing? Here in New Zealand, it’s a… Read More

He was a good boy by Trevor Plumbly

Maternal mitigation When the stuff hits the legal fan, very few mothers, it seems, have rotten kids. Regardless of what some of their offspring stoop to, mum frequently steps up to the plate to defend or offer excuses. It’s a time honoured thing and where minor misdemeanours are concerned, perfectly acceptable, but when it gets applied to serial offenders, I wonder if it’s time to regard crocodile tears as just that. At charitable best, they may well be the expression of years of hopelessness or the final acknowledgement of a long ignored… Read More

In pursuit of truth by Angela Caldin

Beauty is truth, truth beauty – that is all Ye know on earth and all ye need to know. That’s what John Keats wrote in 1819 and he attributed those famous words to an inanimate object – a Grecian urn. They are great words with a real ring about them, poetic, moving, inspirational, but do they get us any nearer to an understanding of what truth actually is? It’s fairly clear that they don’t, nor do they help us to get our heads round the various tamperings with facts and evidence that… Read More