Prorogation: a word for our times by Angela Caldin

There’s a kind of hush over our house now and we are no longer drawn to watching the news at all hours. This is because on Monday 9 September, our prime minister prorogued parliament. This means he’s shut it down so that for the next few weeks we’ll be spared the sight of Boris Johnson making sexist remarks from the despatch box, of Jacob Rees-Mogg lounging arrogantly on the front bench and of the House of Commons flailing around in the mess that is Brexit. Prorogation is a new word for a… Read More

The harms of Morpheus by Trevor Plumbly

Perchance to dream Humidity tends to screw up the old thought processes a bit and, instead of the age-regulated two bottles of Emerson’s Pilsner, I sneak a third in to avoid overnight dehydration. This, however, invites all sorts of nocturnal nasties, most of them political. In the latest I was being interviewed by Sarah Huckabee Sanders for a job as presidential spokesman. Mercifully, unless you’ve conked it, sleep’s an erratic state, but the nasties seem to know opportunity and pounce the minute I drop off. Thus, last night, I ended up in… Read More

The people have spoken by Angela Caldin

It is accepted wisdom that on 23 June 2016, the people of the UK ‘spoke’ in the referendum on whether to leave the EU or to remain. The verdict was in and there was nothing to do but abide by it.  However, it’s now becoming increasingly clear that the people probably didn’t know what they were talking about. Clear cut issues 72% of those eligible spoke, which means that 28% didn’t speak which amounts to quite a lot of people – 10 million or so by my calculation. The margin of difference in… Read More

Alone again by Trevor Plumbly

A bad marriage? The great exit didn’t come as much of a surprise to me, or (much to Emily’s chagrin) that bigger disappointment. In terms of social services, England’s been bursting at the seams for some years, so something had to give. It’s all very well and good for Scotland and Northern Ireland to protest, but both have little or no overpopulation worries; therefore they largely escaped the stress caused by the huge influx of foreign workers and refugees adding to an already strained job market. It could be argued that the… Read More