Balancing acts by Trevor Plumbly

They don’t use balance scales anymore. It’s a shame really; we could learn a lot from the basic principle of equal weight. Unlike pre-packaging, the old scales and weights used to be part and parcel of everyday shopping, representing trust and fairness. Personal costing was an important part of the process, almost ceremonial: for the retailer the accuracy of his scales was the pivot between profit and loss, for the customer they were the dividing line between need and costs. The act of weighing provided a mutual bridge; old fashioned though it… Read More

Look on my works ye mighty and despair by Angela Caldin

A corpulent man with an orange face stood on the Truman balcony at the White House wheezing after a slow ascent of the steps. He pulled his shoulders back and puffed out his chest, telling the world not to let the virus dominate their lives. Little comfort for the families and friends of the two million who have died. He peeled off his mask in a gesture that might have been rehearsed several times in front of a mirror, before going inside to let droplets of infection fall freely on members of… Read More

Hail to the creep by Trevor Plumbly

The cringe machine I couldn’t ignore the guy any longer. As with Hitler and a couple of other despots, we’re likely to have to pay a heavy price for pretending it’s really OK. I know that it’s stretching things a bit to make those comparisons, but aren’t there some eerie similarities? Trump’s campaign rallies fell short of Nuremburg and the stiff arm salute, but the rhetoric got pretty close. The message was familiar and basic; paying court to the unemployed, the disgruntled and the racists creates a natural division and, as with… Read More