The best medicine by Trevor Plumbly

It might be an age thing, but I reckon it’s getting a bit harder to laugh things off these days. Politicians used to be OK for a bit of a giggle, but now, despite their comic instability, there’s something scary about them. There’s little point adding to, or rehashing, any of the ridicule that’s been heaped on Trump and Johnson; it might provide us with a bit of spiteful comfort, but that’s about it. Once elected, they become satire-proof. Until quite recently, political leaders led by example; these days, it seems, integrity… Read More

The Moon and Sixpence by Trevor Plumbly

Lost in space ‘One giant leap for mankind’, but was it really? I don’t want to belittle Mr. Armstrong’s or even America’s achievements in 1969, but I can’t help wondering what, outside a bit of boffin back-slapping and national flag waving, the moon landing and the ensuing trillion dollars’ worth of junk chucked up there has provided any real benefit to improve things down here. I guess the main benefits could be communication, but increasing the current speed of communication is like gilding a lily that’s got a bit rotten in parts…. Read More

Carol Ann Duffy, a Truly Accessible Poet by Angela Caldin

Brief Background on Carol Ann Duffy I knew three things about Carol Ann Duffy a few days ago. I knew she was the Poet Laureate in the UK, following on from Andrew Motion and Ted Hughes. I knew she was the first woman to hold this post. I also knew that she was gay, or perhaps bisexual. Now, since my husband gave me a copy of her collection of poems entitled ‘The World’s Wife’ for my birthday, I know a great deal more. Mainly that she is witty, subversive, inventive, observant, thoughtful,… Read More